Lemon Poppy Seed Bread

Go gourmet with this delicious vegan treat! I gave a slice to a friend, and then I was out of town for a week. When I returned, I had 3 emails requesting the recipe! I’ve had gluten eaters come back for seconds.  This bread is perfect for brunch or a snack, and also works as muffins. It’s largely whole grain, and the Salba seeds lend a wonderful moistness. It’s gluten, dairy, eggs, soy, corn and sugar free and vegan.

I’ve been meaning to post this recipe for a while, and am so glad I got around to it.  It won the Gluten Intolerant Groups‘ (GIG) Healthy recipe contest, and it is quite yummy.

There are a lot of different flours in it.  I suspect that you could substitute most of the flours with an all purpose GF mix, though I don’t know if the rice bran would sub well.  If you try it, please let me know!

Salba gel
1 T whole Salba seed
¼ cup water

½ cup + 2 Tablespoons brown rice flour
½ cup sorghum flour (or teff flour)
½ cup almond meal
¼ cup rice bran
¼ cup sweet rice flour
¼ cup tapioca flour
½ teaspoon salt
1 Tablespoon baking powder
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
2 Tablespoons poppy seeds

2 Tablespoons honey (or agave, for vegan version)
¾ cup orange juice
¼ cup canola or olive oil
¼ cup agave nectar (or 1/3 cup sugar and 2 Tablespoons honey)
Zest of 1 lemon
2 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Line a 9X5 inch bread pan with parchment paper overhanging the edges. Preheat oven to 350º.

Combine Salba seed and water, in a small bowl, set aside. Combine all flours and starches and mix well, eliminating any lumps. Add in poppy seeds.

Zest lemon before juicing. Combine honey and warm orange juice. When well mixed, add in oil, agaves nectar, Salba gel, and lemon juice and lemon zest.

Mix wet and dry ingredients and stir until everything is combined. Bake at 350 for approximately 50 minutes, cover after 30 minutes to prevent over-browning. Check for doneness with a toothpick.

Allow to cool on a drying rack, and remove with parchment paper “handles” after 5 minutes to prevent a soggy bottom. Cool completely on drying rack.

Serve and accept compliments.

Makes one large loaf, or two 5X3 loaves or muffins.

About Cheryl Harris

Life played a funny trick on me. I've studied nutrition for years, and much to my surprise, found out that I could manage many of my health issues via diet. I've been GF for years, and I've got a bunch of allergies and sensitivities. But it definitely doesn't keep me from cooking, baking and enjoying my food. Thanks for stopping by.
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8 Responses to Lemon Poppy Seed Bread

  1. Shellyfish says:

    This sounds so yummy, and a nice change from the maybe 2 GF recipes I have on hand for my GF peeps!

  2. VeggieGirl says:

    MMMM, that sounds refreshing.

  3. Susan Clark says:

    Please, please discuss the difference between plain o’ chia seeds and “Salba” seed flour. I just read “Salba” is a trademark. Is the difference in nutrition really worth the increase in price?
    P.S. can’t wait to get home to my oven so I can try out all these wonderful recipes.
    S

  4. Well, there is a big difference between the seeds and the flour. But chia seeds and Salba seeds are interchangeable for baking. Same goes for Chia flour and Salba flour. The Salba company claims there are differences, health wise, chia companies claim there are not. I’m pretty sure there aren’t studies directly comparing the two.

    Here are links to 2 articles
    http://www.harriswholehealth.com/links-and-files/chia
    http://www.harriswholehealth.com/links-and-files/baking-with-chia

  5. Pingback: Gluten Free Goodness » Blog Archive » Menu Plan Monday Sept 22nd

  6. Pingback: Chia/Salba: Menu Plan Monday | Gluten Free Goodness

  7. Constance solano says:

    Thank you for so much great info. We have just started our new GF life. But my son is also allergic to nuts as well as dairy, soy and gluten. So many GF recipes call for almond flour, etc. Do you know what i could use instead?
    Thanks again!

  8. the only easy almond substitute is hazelnut–which won’t work for your son, either. You could try grinding pumpkinseeds or sunflowerseeds, but I don’t know how well that would work.
    Please do check the sidebar for other blogs which may be of help!

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